Urban Heat Island Mapping Project

Share Urban Heat Island Mapping Project on Facebook Share Urban Heat Island Mapping Project on Twitter Share Urban Heat Island Mapping Project on Linkedin Email Urban Heat Island Mapping Project link

About the Project

The City of Grand Junction was selected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to participate in their initiative to map urban heat islands (UHI). The City is working with NOAA and Climate, Adaptation, Planning, and Analytics (CAPA) Strategies to conduct the Heat Watch mapping event over a period of one day in the summer of 2024.


What are Urban Heat Islands (UHI)?

Urban heat islands are developed areas that experience higher temperatures than their surroundings. Buildings, roadways, and other infrastructure absorb and re-emit the sun's When these man-made structures are highly concentrated and there is limited greenery, pockets of heat form to create the heat island effect. In these "islands," temperatures can be up to 20 degrees Fahrenheit hotter than surrounding areas. Cooling down our city can involve a variety of actions, such as adding more trees for shade; creating water-wise green spaces; opening more public air-conditioned spaces; removing or whitewashing large areas of black asphalt or dark roof surfaces (low albedo surfaces); and engaging in urban design to increase natural airflow through hot neighborhoods. For more information on how other community scientists have engaged in mapping urban heat islands and cooling down their cities, visit CAPA Heat Watch.


What Community Scientist Volunteers Will Be Doing

Community scientist volunteers will hit the streets of Grand Junction to collect data about the distribution of heat using specially designed sensors mounted on moving vehicles. The volunteers will be driving prescribed routes to record ambient temperatures and humidity during three specific times during the day. As heat waves increase in frequency, duration, and magnitude, engaging with our community in collaborative science efforts like this will help connect them with proactive actions.

The mapping day is scheduled for Saturday, July 20, with July 27 and August 3 as backup dates. Since we are estimating when the hottest time of the summer will be, the mapping day may change if there is too much wind, cloud cover, or precipitation forecasted on the anticipated date. About 8 weeks after the mapping day, CAPA and NOAA will send the City a report that contains the results of their analysis of our data. We will share the results with the public and other organizations in the community who are working to mitigate the effects of extreme heat in Grand Junction. Review the Volunteer Packet in the right-side column of this page for more information.

If you want to be involved in the mapping effort, please email sustainability@gjcity.org.


The map below shows the locations that were chosen for NOAA's 2024 Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaigns.

Locations of NOAA's 2024 Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaigns including cities in the US and abroad.


About the Project

The City of Grand Junction was selected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to participate in their initiative to map urban heat islands (UHI). The City is working with NOAA and Climate, Adaptation, Planning, and Analytics (CAPA) Strategies to conduct the Heat Watch mapping event over a period of one day in the summer of 2024.


What are Urban Heat Islands (UHI)?

Urban heat islands are developed areas that experience higher temperatures than their surroundings. Buildings, roadways, and other infrastructure absorb and re-emit the sun's When these man-made structures are highly concentrated and there is limited greenery, pockets of heat form to create the heat island effect. In these "islands," temperatures can be up to 20 degrees Fahrenheit hotter than surrounding areas. Cooling down our city can involve a variety of actions, such as adding more trees for shade; creating water-wise green spaces; opening more public air-conditioned spaces; removing or whitewashing large areas of black asphalt or dark roof surfaces (low albedo surfaces); and engaging in urban design to increase natural airflow through hot neighborhoods. For more information on how other community scientists have engaged in mapping urban heat islands and cooling down their cities, visit CAPA Heat Watch.


What Community Scientist Volunteers Will Be Doing

Community scientist volunteers will hit the streets of Grand Junction to collect data about the distribution of heat using specially designed sensors mounted on moving vehicles. The volunteers will be driving prescribed routes to record ambient temperatures and humidity during three specific times during the day. As heat waves increase in frequency, duration, and magnitude, engaging with our community in collaborative science efforts like this will help connect them with proactive actions.

The mapping day is scheduled for Saturday, July 20, with July 27 and August 3 as backup dates. Since we are estimating when the hottest time of the summer will be, the mapping day may change if there is too much wind, cloud cover, or precipitation forecasted on the anticipated date. About 8 weeks after the mapping day, CAPA and NOAA will send the City a report that contains the results of their analysis of our data. We will share the results with the public and other organizations in the community who are working to mitigate the effects of extreme heat in Grand Junction. Review the Volunteer Packet in the right-side column of this page for more information.

If you want to be involved in the mapping effort, please email sustainability@gjcity.org.


The map below shows the locations that were chosen for NOAA's 2024 Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaigns.

Locations of NOAA's 2024 Urban Heat Island Mapping Campaigns including cities in the US and abroad.


Share Keep Grand Junction Cool on Facebook Share Keep Grand Junction Cool on Twitter Share Keep Grand Junction Cool on Linkedin Email Keep Grand Junction Cool link

Keep Grand Junction Cool

about 2 months

Where do we need to cool down Grand Junction? Add pins of significant locations in Grand Junction where we should consider the impacts of heat.

If you have photos of the location, please add them! If you have ideas for cooling strategies for the location you indicated, please add them!

Page last updated: 17 Jul 2024, 07:32 AM