Shared Micromobility Pilot

Share Shared Micromobility Pilot on Facebook Share Shared Micromobility Pilot on Twitter Share Shared Micromobility Pilot on Linkedin Email Shared Micromobility Pilot link

We are seeking your feedback! Please fill out the 1-year community survey here.


About Micromobility in Grand Junction

Starting on May 16, 2023, the City launched an 18-month pilot for community members to access shared e-scooters, which can be rented via a smartphone app. Community members will be able to rent these shared micromobility devices during the pilot to navigate around the City. The groundwork for the pilot began in June 2022 with community listening sessions and a City Council public hearing to gather feedback from community members about interest in shared micromobility devices. The City proceeded with a Request for Proposals (RFP), leading to a Pilot Agreement for Bird and Lime each to operate a fleet of e-scooters within a Pilot Area inside City limits. The Pilot Area extends from 24 Rd to 28 1/2 Rd alignment and from I-70/Horizon Drive to the Fairgrounds on Orchard Mesa - see the blue outline boundary on the map in our document widget or on the interactive map, where you can also view the operating zones.

You can hear more about the Shared Micromobility Pilot below:


Now What?

Our Engage GJ Micromobility project page will be live throughout the duration of the pilot to allow community members to provide input on their experience with the e-scooters. Use the interactive map to add a pin where you felt good about traveling on an e-scooter or answer our survey about your most recent ride. Would e-scooters be a good way to get to work or to access recreation, shopping, or dining in downtown Grand Junction or the Horizon Drive area?

This pilot study is designed to evaluate options for residents to get from one place to another in our City. This pilot study aims to assess the performance of evolving transportation modes and monitor and regulate the private operation of shared micromobility, and e-scooters, in the City.

The shared micromobility team has made a number of pivots to improve the safety and ease of e-scooter operations in the city:

Scooters were perceived as...So, we have...
...dangerous due to speedy sidewalk riding downtown....temporarily increased "Walk your wheels" signage downtown and are evaluating permanent stenciled sidewalk markings.
...activated in-app reminders, in addition to permanent stickers on each device, remidning riders not to ride on sidewalks.
...implemented overlays on Main St and Colorado Ave to inhibit sidewalk riding.
...occupying too much on-street parking....relocated parking corrals to buffer zones, with only six (under 1/5) remaining in vehicular parking stalls.
...visually cluttering the streets downtown....expanded parking options to better disperse the fleet within the pilot boundary, enhancing visual "order."
...frivolous or not worth the rental fees....analyzed quantitative trip data to demonstrate that many of the riders are taking trips which would likely have otherwise happened in a motor vehicle.


If you ride an e-scooter to downtown, CMU, Lincoln Park, Canyon View Park, or Las Colonias Park, please find a designated parking corral to end your ride!


Have a concern or issue with a scooter?

Please contact the operator via its app or the contact information here:

Vendor ContactBirdLime
Phone:1-866-205-24421-888-LIME-345
Email:hello@bird.cosupport@li.me
Website:www.bird.cowww.li.me

We are seeking your feedback! Please fill out the 1-year community survey here.


About Micromobility in Grand Junction

Starting on May 16, 2023, the City launched an 18-month pilot for community members to access shared e-scooters, which can be rented via a smartphone app. Community members will be able to rent these shared micromobility devices during the pilot to navigate around the City. The groundwork for the pilot began in June 2022 with community listening sessions and a City Council public hearing to gather feedback from community members about interest in shared micromobility devices. The City proceeded with a Request for Proposals (RFP), leading to a Pilot Agreement for Bird and Lime each to operate a fleet of e-scooters within a Pilot Area inside City limits. The Pilot Area extends from 24 Rd to 28 1/2 Rd alignment and from I-70/Horizon Drive to the Fairgrounds on Orchard Mesa - see the blue outline boundary on the map in our document widget or on the interactive map, where you can also view the operating zones.

You can hear more about the Shared Micromobility Pilot below:


Now What?

Our Engage GJ Micromobility project page will be live throughout the duration of the pilot to allow community members to provide input on their experience with the e-scooters. Use the interactive map to add a pin where you felt good about traveling on an e-scooter or answer our survey about your most recent ride. Would e-scooters be a good way to get to work or to access recreation, shopping, or dining in downtown Grand Junction or the Horizon Drive area?

This pilot study is designed to evaluate options for residents to get from one place to another in our City. This pilot study aims to assess the performance of evolving transportation modes and monitor and regulate the private operation of shared micromobility, and e-scooters, in the City.

The shared micromobility team has made a number of pivots to improve the safety and ease of e-scooter operations in the city:

Scooters were perceived as...So, we have...
...dangerous due to speedy sidewalk riding downtown....temporarily increased "Walk your wheels" signage downtown and are evaluating permanent stenciled sidewalk markings.
...activated in-app reminders, in addition to permanent stickers on each device, remidning riders not to ride on sidewalks.
...implemented overlays on Main St and Colorado Ave to inhibit sidewalk riding.
...occupying too much on-street parking....relocated parking corrals to buffer zones, with only six (under 1/5) remaining in vehicular parking stalls.
...visually cluttering the streets downtown....expanded parking options to better disperse the fleet within the pilot boundary, enhancing visual "order."
...frivolous or not worth the rental fees....analyzed quantitative trip data to demonstrate that many of the riders are taking trips which would likely have otherwise happened in a motor vehicle.


If you ride an e-scooter to downtown, CMU, Lincoln Park, Canyon View Park, or Las Colonias Park, please find a designated parking corral to end your ride!


Have a concern or issue with a scooter?

Please contact the operator via its app or the contact information here:

Vendor ContactBirdLime
Phone:1-866-205-24421-888-LIME-345
Email:hello@bird.cosupport@li.me
Website:www.bird.cowww.li.me

Leave us a question about the pilot!

You need to be signed in to add your question.

  • Share Is there an age requirement or any verification of age? I have seen children riding escooters down Gunnison after school and often times they run red lights/ stop signs. I have seen cars forced to slam on their brakes to avoid hitting the kids. Also scooter riders who use the street rarely obey traffic laws. I'm all for innovative solutions to alleviate the problems in town, but it's making certain areas much more risky to travel around. on Facebook Share Is there an age requirement or any verification of age? I have seen children riding escooters down Gunnison after school and often times they run red lights/ stop signs. I have seen cars forced to slam on their brakes to avoid hitting the kids. Also scooter riders who use the street rarely obey traffic laws. I'm all for innovative solutions to alleviate the problems in town, but it's making certain areas much more risky to travel around. on Twitter Share Is there an age requirement or any verification of age? I have seen children riding escooters down Gunnison after school and often times they run red lights/ stop signs. I have seen cars forced to slam on their brakes to avoid hitting the kids. Also scooter riders who use the street rarely obey traffic laws. I'm all for innovative solutions to alleviate the problems in town, but it's making certain areas much more risky to travel around. on Linkedin Email Is there an age requirement or any verification of age? I have seen children riding escooters down Gunnison after school and often times they run red lights/ stop signs. I have seen cars forced to slam on their brakes to avoid hitting the kids. Also scooter riders who use the street rarely obey traffic laws. I'm all for innovative solutions to alleviate the problems in town, but it's making certain areas much more risky to travel around. link

    Is there an age requirement or any verification of age? I have seen children riding escooters down Gunnison after school and often times they run red lights/ stop signs. I have seen cars forced to slam on their brakes to avoid hitting the kids. Also scooter riders who use the street rarely obey traffic laws. I'm all for innovative solutions to alleviate the problems in town, but it's making certain areas much more risky to travel around.

    Maverick asked 7 days ago

    Hi Maverick, City and State law do not dictate a minimum age for ridership. Private operators Bird and Lime do have minimum age requirements, which are likely self-reported by the renter.

  • Share Okay, it has been a year, and here is what I have seen so far: I tried the scooters once myself about 9-10 months ago. It was very convenient to get across town to pick up my car form the shop and not have to arrange a ride from a friend or family member. I live about 2/10 of a mile outside of the geofence, so I had to walk a bit to find an available scooter (found a Lime scooter at the edge of the geofence). On the parts of the trip that were along the Riverside Parkway where there is a nice wide sidewalk and little-to-no foot traffic, the trip was smooth. Once I had to move onto the streets, it was scary as heck. There are not bike lanes on the majority of GJ's streets and the pavement is very rough, with cracks and potholes on the edge where a scooter might want to ride. Will streets be repaired to make operating these scooters safer? Will there be streets that are designated for scooter traffic and/or streets where scooter traffic is prohibited? In parking lots, the riders often zip around, not following traffic lanes, but cutting across and darting out from between parked cars. How can this safety concern be addressed? On a trip downtown at night this weekend, I saw many of these scooters out at around midnight. The reflective devices, and headlights are inadequate to make the scooters/riders visible from a distance. This is extremely dangerous for the riders and not fair to the motorist who will be held liable if they hit a moving object they can barely see. Why to these devices not have better front and rear lights, side reflectors, or be restricted to daylight use only? Recently, I was traveling in my car on North Avenue at about 5:30 pm on a weekday (rush hour, before time change when it was dusk), when a rider inexplicably moved from riding in the far right lane (where I was), to ride the center of the inside/left lane. I assumed he was preparing to turn Left, and was moving over for that purpose, however, he continued in the center of that lane for about 1 mile. He was moving at approximately 20 mph in a 35 mph zone where cars are used to going about 40 mph (it used to be 40 mph years ago). A line of cars formed behind him. Going 15 MPH under the speed limit for long distances and refusing to move to the right while in heavy traffic certainly violates the law: Colorado law prohibits motor vehicle operators from driving at such a slow speed that they impede the normal and reasonable forward movement of traffic, unless their slow speed is necessary for the safe operation of the vehicle. In these situations, the driver must drive in the right‑hand lane if there is one available on the roadway, or pull off the roadway when possible to allow any impeded traffic to pass. I know these devices are supposed to use highly accurate geofencing to keep them off sidewalks in certain areas, so they also need to have the ability to track where riders are using them in travel lanes and give warnings to move right when they are traveling under the posted speed limit and restricting the flow of traffic. This was VERY dangerous to the rider especially. And nearly caused several rear-end collisions for cars not expecting traffic to suddenly come to a crawl. How will impeding traffic be addressed? I have also been irritated by the lack of designated places to park scooters, resulting in the whole city looking like it is inhabited by a pack of 10 year olds who rode home and dumped their bikes in the middle of the sidewalk. They litter the sidewalks making them impassible for people with wheelchairs and walkers, parents pushing strollers, and folks trying to walk or run safely. How will this be further addressed? on Facebook Share Okay, it has been a year, and here is what I have seen so far: I tried the scooters once myself about 9-10 months ago. It was very convenient to get across town to pick up my car form the shop and not have to arrange a ride from a friend or family member. I live about 2/10 of a mile outside of the geofence, so I had to walk a bit to find an available scooter (found a Lime scooter at the edge of the geofence). On the parts of the trip that were along the Riverside Parkway where there is a nice wide sidewalk and little-to-no foot traffic, the trip was smooth. Once I had to move onto the streets, it was scary as heck. There are not bike lanes on the majority of GJ's streets and the pavement is very rough, with cracks and potholes on the edge where a scooter might want to ride. Will streets be repaired to make operating these scooters safer? Will there be streets that are designated for scooter traffic and/or streets where scooter traffic is prohibited? In parking lots, the riders often zip around, not following traffic lanes, but cutting across and darting out from between parked cars. How can this safety concern be addressed? On a trip downtown at night this weekend, I saw many of these scooters out at around midnight. The reflective devices, and headlights are inadequate to make the scooters/riders visible from a distance. This is extremely dangerous for the riders and not fair to the motorist who will be held liable if they hit a moving object they can barely see. Why to these devices not have better front and rear lights, side reflectors, or be restricted to daylight use only? Recently, I was traveling in my car on North Avenue at about 5:30 pm on a weekday (rush hour, before time change when it was dusk), when a rider inexplicably moved from riding in the far right lane (where I was), to ride the center of the inside/left lane. I assumed he was preparing to turn Left, and was moving over for that purpose, however, he continued in the center of that lane for about 1 mile. He was moving at approximately 20 mph in a 35 mph zone where cars are used to going about 40 mph (it used to be 40 mph years ago). A line of cars formed behind him. Going 15 MPH under the speed limit for long distances and refusing to move to the right while in heavy traffic certainly violates the law: Colorado law prohibits motor vehicle operators from driving at such a slow speed that they impede the normal and reasonable forward movement of traffic, unless their slow speed is necessary for the safe operation of the vehicle. In these situations, the driver must drive in the right‑hand lane if there is one available on the roadway, or pull off the roadway when possible to allow any impeded traffic to pass. I know these devices are supposed to use highly accurate geofencing to keep them off sidewalks in certain areas, so they also need to have the ability to track where riders are using them in travel lanes and give warnings to move right when they are traveling under the posted speed limit and restricting the flow of traffic. This was VERY dangerous to the rider especially. And nearly caused several rear-end collisions for cars not expecting traffic to suddenly come to a crawl. How will impeding traffic be addressed? I have also been irritated by the lack of designated places to park scooters, resulting in the whole city looking like it is inhabited by a pack of 10 year olds who rode home and dumped their bikes in the middle of the sidewalk. They litter the sidewalks making them impassible for people with wheelchairs and walkers, parents pushing strollers, and folks trying to walk or run safely. How will this be further addressed? on Twitter Share Okay, it has been a year, and here is what I have seen so far: I tried the scooters once myself about 9-10 months ago. It was very convenient to get across town to pick up my car form the shop and not have to arrange a ride from a friend or family member. I live about 2/10 of a mile outside of the geofence, so I had to walk a bit to find an available scooter (found a Lime scooter at the edge of the geofence). On the parts of the trip that were along the Riverside Parkway where there is a nice wide sidewalk and little-to-no foot traffic, the trip was smooth. Once I had to move onto the streets, it was scary as heck. There are not bike lanes on the majority of GJ's streets and the pavement is very rough, with cracks and potholes on the edge where a scooter might want to ride. Will streets be repaired to make operating these scooters safer? Will there be streets that are designated for scooter traffic and/or streets where scooter traffic is prohibited? In parking lots, the riders often zip around, not following traffic lanes, but cutting across and darting out from between parked cars. How can this safety concern be addressed? On a trip downtown at night this weekend, I saw many of these scooters out at around midnight. The reflective devices, and headlights are inadequate to make the scooters/riders visible from a distance. This is extremely dangerous for the riders and not fair to the motorist who will be held liable if they hit a moving object they can barely see. Why to these devices not have better front and rear lights, side reflectors, or be restricted to daylight use only? Recently, I was traveling in my car on North Avenue at about 5:30 pm on a weekday (rush hour, before time change when it was dusk), when a rider inexplicably moved from riding in the far right lane (where I was), to ride the center of the inside/left lane. I assumed he was preparing to turn Left, and was moving over for that purpose, however, he continued in the center of that lane for about 1 mile. He was moving at approximately 20 mph in a 35 mph zone where cars are used to going about 40 mph (it used to be 40 mph years ago). A line of cars formed behind him. Going 15 MPH under the speed limit for long distances and refusing to move to the right while in heavy traffic certainly violates the law: Colorado law prohibits motor vehicle operators from driving at such a slow speed that they impede the normal and reasonable forward movement of traffic, unless their slow speed is necessary for the safe operation of the vehicle. In these situations, the driver must drive in the right‑hand lane if there is one available on the roadway, or pull off the roadway when possible to allow any impeded traffic to pass. I know these devices are supposed to use highly accurate geofencing to keep them off sidewalks in certain areas, so they also need to have the ability to track where riders are using them in travel lanes and give warnings to move right when they are traveling under the posted speed limit and restricting the flow of traffic. This was VERY dangerous to the rider especially. And nearly caused several rear-end collisions for cars not expecting traffic to suddenly come to a crawl. How will impeding traffic be addressed? I have also been irritated by the lack of designated places to park scooters, resulting in the whole city looking like it is inhabited by a pack of 10 year olds who rode home and dumped their bikes in the middle of the sidewalk. They litter the sidewalks making them impassible for people with wheelchairs and walkers, parents pushing strollers, and folks trying to walk or run safely. How will this be further addressed? on Linkedin Email Okay, it has been a year, and here is what I have seen so far: I tried the scooters once myself about 9-10 months ago. It was very convenient to get across town to pick up my car form the shop and not have to arrange a ride from a friend or family member. I live about 2/10 of a mile outside of the geofence, so I had to walk a bit to find an available scooter (found a Lime scooter at the edge of the geofence). On the parts of the trip that were along the Riverside Parkway where there is a nice wide sidewalk and little-to-no foot traffic, the trip was smooth. Once I had to move onto the streets, it was scary as heck. There are not bike lanes on the majority of GJ's streets and the pavement is very rough, with cracks and potholes on the edge where a scooter might want to ride. Will streets be repaired to make operating these scooters safer? Will there be streets that are designated for scooter traffic and/or streets where scooter traffic is prohibited? In parking lots, the riders often zip around, not following traffic lanes, but cutting across and darting out from between parked cars. How can this safety concern be addressed? On a trip downtown at night this weekend, I saw many of these scooters out at around midnight. The reflective devices, and headlights are inadequate to make the scooters/riders visible from a distance. This is extremely dangerous for the riders and not fair to the motorist who will be held liable if they hit a moving object they can barely see. Why to these devices not have better front and rear lights, side reflectors, or be restricted to daylight use only? Recently, I was traveling in my car on North Avenue at about 5:30 pm on a weekday (rush hour, before time change when it was dusk), when a rider inexplicably moved from riding in the far right lane (where I was), to ride the center of the inside/left lane. I assumed he was preparing to turn Left, and was moving over for that purpose, however, he continued in the center of that lane for about 1 mile. He was moving at approximately 20 mph in a 35 mph zone where cars are used to going about 40 mph (it used to be 40 mph years ago). A line of cars formed behind him. Going 15 MPH under the speed limit for long distances and refusing to move to the right while in heavy traffic certainly violates the law: Colorado law prohibits motor vehicle operators from driving at such a slow speed that they impede the normal and reasonable forward movement of traffic, unless their slow speed is necessary for the safe operation of the vehicle. In these situations, the driver must drive in the right‑hand lane if there is one available on the roadway, or pull off the roadway when possible to allow any impeded traffic to pass. I know these devices are supposed to use highly accurate geofencing to keep them off sidewalks in certain areas, so they also need to have the ability to track where riders are using them in travel lanes and give warnings to move right when they are traveling under the posted speed limit and restricting the flow of traffic. This was VERY dangerous to the rider especially. And nearly caused several rear-end collisions for cars not expecting traffic to suddenly come to a crawl. How will impeding traffic be addressed? I have also been irritated by the lack of designated places to park scooters, resulting in the whole city looking like it is inhabited by a pack of 10 year olds who rode home and dumped their bikes in the middle of the sidewalk. They litter the sidewalks making them impassible for people with wheelchairs and walkers, parents pushing strollers, and folks trying to walk or run safely. How will this be further addressed? link

    Okay, it has been a year, and here is what I have seen so far: I tried the scooters once myself about 9-10 months ago. It was very convenient to get across town to pick up my car form the shop and not have to arrange a ride from a friend or family member. I live about 2/10 of a mile outside of the geofence, so I had to walk a bit to find an available scooter (found a Lime scooter at the edge of the geofence). On the parts of the trip that were along the Riverside Parkway where there is a nice wide sidewalk and little-to-no foot traffic, the trip was smooth. Once I had to move onto the streets, it was scary as heck. There are not bike lanes on the majority of GJ's streets and the pavement is very rough, with cracks and potholes on the edge where a scooter might want to ride. Will streets be repaired to make operating these scooters safer? Will there be streets that are designated for scooter traffic and/or streets where scooter traffic is prohibited? In parking lots, the riders often zip around, not following traffic lanes, but cutting across and darting out from between parked cars. How can this safety concern be addressed? On a trip downtown at night this weekend, I saw many of these scooters out at around midnight. The reflective devices, and headlights are inadequate to make the scooters/riders visible from a distance. This is extremely dangerous for the riders and not fair to the motorist who will be held liable if they hit a moving object they can barely see. Why to these devices not have better front and rear lights, side reflectors, or be restricted to daylight use only? Recently, I was traveling in my car on North Avenue at about 5:30 pm on a weekday (rush hour, before time change when it was dusk), when a rider inexplicably moved from riding in the far right lane (where I was), to ride the center of the inside/left lane. I assumed he was preparing to turn Left, and was moving over for that purpose, however, he continued in the center of that lane for about 1 mile. He was moving at approximately 20 mph in a 35 mph zone where cars are used to going about 40 mph (it used to be 40 mph years ago). A line of cars formed behind him. Going 15 MPH under the speed limit for long distances and refusing to move to the right while in heavy traffic certainly violates the law: Colorado law prohibits motor vehicle operators from driving at such a slow speed that they impede the normal and reasonable forward movement of traffic, unless their slow speed is necessary for the safe operation of the vehicle. In these situations, the driver must drive in the right‑hand lane if there is one available on the roadway, or pull off the roadway when possible to allow any impeded traffic to pass. I know these devices are supposed to use highly accurate geofencing to keep them off sidewalks in certain areas, so they also need to have the ability to track where riders are using them in travel lanes and give warnings to move right when they are traveling under the posted speed limit and restricting the flow of traffic. This was VERY dangerous to the rider especially. And nearly caused several rear-end collisions for cars not expecting traffic to suddenly come to a crawl. How will impeding traffic be addressed? I have also been irritated by the lack of designated places to park scooters, resulting in the whole city looking like it is inhabited by a pack of 10 year olds who rode home and dumped their bikes in the middle of the sidewalk. They litter the sidewalks making them impassible for people with wheelchairs and walkers, parents pushing strollers, and folks trying to walk or run safely. How will this be further addressed?

    cowboyblondie asked 7 days ago

    Hi Cowboy, I'm sorry to hear that your experience on the e-scooter was not comfortable. It sounds like your questions generally revolve around where the vehicles can be operated and parked. Our roadway network remains open for all travelers, except where posted (like freeway on-ramps), so there is no plan to exclude e-scooters (shared or personally owned) from any City streets. That said, users are supposed to stay on sidewalks or in cycle lanes on high speed roadways, where available. As for the streets where scooter use is recommended, we are working with the private operators, Bird and Lime, to see how we can more widely distribute either our Wayfinding map and/or our Bicycle Network map to help guide users to the corridors which are lower volume/speed or have better facilities.

    Regarding parking, things have been kept fairly clean and organized in the Downtown area via requiring parking in designated corral areas. If we choose to continue the pilot beyond November, we will have the option to expand the area covered by this policy by increasing the number of designated and required parking areas.

  • Share When people use these scooters, I assume they have to agree to a contract. Where can I read these contracts? on Facebook Share When people use these scooters, I assume they have to agree to a contract. Where can I read these contracts? on Twitter Share When people use these scooters, I assume they have to agree to a contract. Where can I read these contracts? on Linkedin Email When people use these scooters, I assume they have to agree to a contract. Where can I read these contracts? link

    When people use these scooters, I assume they have to agree to a contract. Where can I read these contracts?

    Lloyd asked 8 days ago

    Hi Lloyd, the private operators, Bird and Lime, each have user acknowledgements when people register within its respective app. If you would like to see those agreements, the easiest way would be to download one or both apps on a smartphone. To complete the registration, you will be prompted to agree to the acknowledgement.

  • Share Although I don’t use the e-scooters myself, I have been jazzed to see people on them. I volunteer on UTC and we saw spectacular numbers for usage at the beginning of the pilot. I do hope the numbers are continuing to grow. There are healthier and safer ways for people to move about the city, and this is one example of that. Thank you! on Facebook Share Although I don’t use the e-scooters myself, I have been jazzed to see people on them. I volunteer on UTC and we saw spectacular numbers for usage at the beginning of the pilot. I do hope the numbers are continuing to grow. There are healthier and safer ways for people to move about the city, and this is one example of that. Thank you! on Twitter Share Although I don’t use the e-scooters myself, I have been jazzed to see people on them. I volunteer on UTC and we saw spectacular numbers for usage at the beginning of the pilot. I do hope the numbers are continuing to grow. There are healthier and safer ways for people to move about the city, and this is one example of that. Thank you! on Linkedin Email Although I don’t use the e-scooters myself, I have been jazzed to see people on them. I volunteer on UTC and we saw spectacular numbers for usage at the beginning of the pilot. I do hope the numbers are continuing to grow. There are healthier and safer ways for people to move about the city, and this is one example of that. Thank you! link

    Although I don’t use the e-scooters myself, I have been jazzed to see people on them. I volunteer on UTC and we saw spectacular numbers for usage at the beginning of the pilot. I do hope the numbers are continuing to grow. There are healthier and safer ways for people to move about the city, and this is one example of that. Thank you!

    BrookeACarlson asked 7 days ago

    BrookeACarlson, thank you for your feedback! 

  • Share When will this horrendous program end? With all the scooters littering the sidewalks and properties, this town is starting to look like a junk yard. on Facebook Share When will this horrendous program end? With all the scooters littering the sidewalks and properties, this town is starting to look like a junk yard. on Twitter Share When will this horrendous program end? With all the scooters littering the sidewalks and properties, this town is starting to look like a junk yard. on Linkedin Email When will this horrendous program end? With all the scooters littering the sidewalks and properties, this town is starting to look like a junk yard. link

    When will this horrendous program end? With all the scooters littering the sidewalks and properties, this town is starting to look like a junk yard.

    JG asked 17 days ago

    Hi JG, I'm sorry you don't like the aesthetics of the e-scooters. The pilot is scheduled to end in mid-November. Prior to that time, staff and Council will be considering options to (A) let the pilot expire with no further action, (B) renew the pilot with or without changes, or (C) implement an enduring permitting process with or without changes.

    Perspectives like yours are helpful in constructing staff recommendations. I encourage you to participate on our survey linked at the top of the Engage page.

  • Share Can I ride my RT200 trail bike on those paths its 96cc top speed 27mph?? When there are scooters now that go 40+mph on Facebook Share Can I ride my RT200 trail bike on those paths its 96cc top speed 27mph?? When there are scooters now that go 40+mph on Twitter Share Can I ride my RT200 trail bike on those paths its 96cc top speed 27mph?? When there are scooters now that go 40+mph on Linkedin Email Can I ride my RT200 trail bike on those paths its 96cc top speed 27mph?? When there are scooters now that go 40+mph link

    Can I ride my RT200 trail bike on those paths its 96cc top speed 27mph?? When there are scooters now that go 40+mph

    KidFich3172 asked 8 months ago

    Hi KidFich, the scooters in our micromobility pilot are currently limited to 15-20 MPH. The sidewalk speed limit is 6 MPH. The shared scooters or your personally owned device can legally be operated on North Avenue up to the speed limit of 30-35 MPH in the general travel lanes.

  • Share How is this sustainable? Will the bike companies continue to pick up the scooters and service them and keep them charged when the city takes this on permanently? Are you monitoring when the scooters are being used..i.e. 10pm on a friday and Saturday nights vs 8 am monday morning to go to work? on Facebook Share How is this sustainable? Will the bike companies continue to pick up the scooters and service them and keep them charged when the city takes this on permanently? Are you monitoring when the scooters are being used..i.e. 10pm on a friday and Saturday nights vs 8 am monday morning to go to work? on Twitter Share How is this sustainable? Will the bike companies continue to pick up the scooters and service them and keep them charged when the city takes this on permanently? Are you monitoring when the scooters are being used..i.e. 10pm on a friday and Saturday nights vs 8 am monday morning to go to work? on Linkedin Email How is this sustainable? Will the bike companies continue to pick up the scooters and service them and keep them charged when the city takes this on permanently? Are you monitoring when the scooters are being used..i.e. 10pm on a friday and Saturday nights vs 8 am monday morning to go to work? link

    How is this sustainable? Will the bike companies continue to pick up the scooters and service them and keep them charged when the city takes this on permanently? Are you monitoring when the scooters are being used..i.e. 10pm on a friday and Saturday nights vs 8 am monday morning to go to work?

    reginastout asked 10 months ago

    Hi Reginastout, during the pilot, each operator owns and manages its fleet. If we choose to continue beyond the pilot with either or both of the operators, each will continue to do so.  We do monitor key utilization metrics, including Trips per Vehicle per Day (TVD), distribution of distance of rides, and time of day and day of week.

  • Share Why would you take a prime parking spot at the post office to park these things? Parking is already tough there. on Facebook Share Why would you take a prime parking spot at the post office to park these things? Parking is already tough there. on Twitter Share Why would you take a prime parking spot at the post office to park these things? Parking is already tough there. on Linkedin Email Why would you take a prime parking spot at the post office to park these things? Parking is already tough there. link

    Why would you take a prime parking spot at the post office to park these things? Parking is already tough there.

    dboe350668 asked about 1 year ago

    Hi Dboe, one of the advantages of micromobility is the small size of the vehicles, meaning that within one parking stall, which could be used by one patron of our downtown businesses, up to a dozen or more people could travel downtown and occupy the same footprint.  That said, we are actively monitoring the utilization of the parking corrals and moving them out of parking stalls and into buffer space when possible.

  • Share Really looking forward to having these available all over town, and for a dollar and change I do all my running around town to grab a bite to eat, grocery run etc. From what I understand, the Bird App will show where an available scooter is on the map? I walk to it, log on and ride to a store...park it like its a bicycle out of the way. The when I exit the store I can log back on..... ride it home and park it in my front yard next to the sidewalk and log off. Or can you only pick them up...and drop them off at those few parking areas located on the map? on Facebook Share Really looking forward to having these available all over town, and for a dollar and change I do all my running around town to grab a bite to eat, grocery run etc. From what I understand, the Bird App will show where an available scooter is on the map? I walk to it, log on and ride to a store...park it like its a bicycle out of the way. The when I exit the store I can log back on..... ride it home and park it in my front yard next to the sidewalk and log off. Or can you only pick them up...and drop them off at those few parking areas located on the map? on Twitter Share Really looking forward to having these available all over town, and for a dollar and change I do all my running around town to grab a bite to eat, grocery run etc. From what I understand, the Bird App will show where an available scooter is on the map? I walk to it, log on and ride to a store...park it like its a bicycle out of the way. The when I exit the store I can log back on..... ride it home and park it in my front yard next to the sidewalk and log off. Or can you only pick them up...and drop them off at those few parking areas located on the map? on Linkedin Email Really looking forward to having these available all over town, and for a dollar and change I do all my running around town to grab a bite to eat, grocery run etc. From what I understand, the Bird App will show where an available scooter is on the map? I walk to it, log on and ride to a store...park it like its a bicycle out of the way. The when I exit the store I can log back on..... ride it home and park it in my front yard next to the sidewalk and log off. Or can you only pick them up...and drop them off at those few parking areas located on the map? link

    Really looking forward to having these available all over town, and for a dollar and change I do all my running around town to grab a bite to eat, grocery run etc. From what I understand, the Bird App will show where an available scooter is on the map? I walk to it, log on and ride to a store...park it like its a bicycle out of the way. The when I exit the store I can log back on..... ride it home and park it in my front yard next to the sidewalk and log off. Or can you only pick them up...and drop them off at those few parking areas located on the map?

    Fergman asked about 1 year ago

    Hi Fergman, I'm glad you are looking forward to using this new mode during the pilot.  Throughout most of the Pilot Area, you may park your device directly at your destination (as long as it is not blocking the sidewalk or public or private access).  Only within the Downtown zone, CMU zone, or certain parks, including Canyon View, Lincoln, and Riverfront do you have to locate a corral to end your trip.  Those corral locations are visually demarked on the street as well as within the Bird or Lime app.

  • Share I came from a big city that had these. Cool idea at first. In reality it became a pedestrian nuisance to constantly be dodging these high speed scooters on the sidewalks. How does the City plan to enforce the speed limit and what is the penalty for violations? Also, riders rarely use helmets so be prepared for a huge surge in hospital visits when they start crashing. Lastly, look forward to seeing scooters laying EVERYWHERE, each day, since there is no incentive to the rider to park them in the correct places. Prices seem too high as riding my bike is free. on Facebook Share I came from a big city that had these. Cool idea at first. In reality it became a pedestrian nuisance to constantly be dodging these high speed scooters on the sidewalks. How does the City plan to enforce the speed limit and what is the penalty for violations? Also, riders rarely use helmets so be prepared for a huge surge in hospital visits when they start crashing. Lastly, look forward to seeing scooters laying EVERYWHERE, each day, since there is no incentive to the rider to park them in the correct places. Prices seem too high as riding my bike is free. on Twitter Share I came from a big city that had these. Cool idea at first. In reality it became a pedestrian nuisance to constantly be dodging these high speed scooters on the sidewalks. How does the City plan to enforce the speed limit and what is the penalty for violations? Also, riders rarely use helmets so be prepared for a huge surge in hospital visits when they start crashing. Lastly, look forward to seeing scooters laying EVERYWHERE, each day, since there is no incentive to the rider to park them in the correct places. Prices seem too high as riding my bike is free. on Linkedin Email I came from a big city that had these. Cool idea at first. In reality it became a pedestrian nuisance to constantly be dodging these high speed scooters on the sidewalks. How does the City plan to enforce the speed limit and what is the penalty for violations? Also, riders rarely use helmets so be prepared for a huge surge in hospital visits when they start crashing. Lastly, look forward to seeing scooters laying EVERYWHERE, each day, since there is no incentive to the rider to park them in the correct places. Prices seem too high as riding my bike is free. link

    I came from a big city that had these. Cool idea at first. In reality it became a pedestrian nuisance to constantly be dodging these high speed scooters on the sidewalks. How does the City plan to enforce the speed limit and what is the penalty for violations? Also, riders rarely use helmets so be prepared for a huge surge in hospital visits when they start crashing. Lastly, look forward to seeing scooters laying EVERYWHERE, each day, since there is no incentive to the rider to park them in the correct places. Prices seem too high as riding my bike is free.

    James B asked about 1 year ago

    Hi James, thanks for providing your perspective and experience with shared micromobility.  When available and safe, it is recommended that scooter riders use cycle lanes.  In our busiest corridors downtown, users are prohibited from riding on sidewalks on Main Street and Colorado Ave between 1st and 7th St and on 7th St from Colorado to Grand.  In other parts of the city, where sidewalk riding is allowed, consistent with sidewalk bicycle riding, the speed limit on sidewalks is 6 MPH per city ordinance.

    Regarding parking, we do have certain areas of the city where scooters must be left in designated areas to help keep things organized in those busy areas like downtown.

    While the costs may be higher than using your own bicycle, certain users may find value in saving time over walking, having more fun than driving, or not having to worry about security or maintenance of their personally owned micromobility device.

Page last updated: 24 May 2024, 11:44 AM