Grand Junction Regional Water Efficiency Plan

Share Grand Junction Regional Water Efficiency Plan on Facebook Share Grand Junction Regional Water Efficiency Plan on Twitter Share Grand Junction Regional Water Efficiency Plan on Linkedin Email Grand Junction Regional Water Efficiency Plan link

The comment period for the Regional Water Efficiency Plan has closed. Thank you for your interest an be sure to check out our other projects. 

What is the Water Efficiency Plan?

The City of Grand Junction in collaboration with the Ute Water Conservancy District and the Clifton Water District has developed a Regional Water Efficiency Plan (WEP). The purpose of the WEP is to help water utilities improve the overall water use efficiency by addressing issues of supply and demand and providing a defined method of solving problems and dealing with system inefficiencies. The WEP also provides both water utilities and the local communities with a means of using water resources wisely and prudently thus managing this precious exhaustible resource to its maximal responsible use. Community members are encouraged to review the plan and leave their questions regarding input on specific parts of the plan. In addition, an Ideas tab is located below to share ideas about the plan.

The WEP includes the following elements: profiles of existing water supply systems, historical water demands and demand forecasts, water efficiency goals, selection of water efficiency activities, and implementation and monitoring plans. Specific water conservation measures included in the WEP include reducing water system losses, replacing water fountains in schools with water bottle filling stations, toilet retrofits, audits of high-water users, implementing greywater systems, and turf replacement.

How can the community help?

This WEP is an update to the initial Water Conservation Plan adopted in 2012 and is intended to be broad and flexible so that it can be adapted to changing water conservation efforts over time. The goal of the regional WEP is to provide unified water education and community outreach programs that will aid the public in developing meaningful water conservation practices. City staff and our community partners want to hear your input on the WEP and other educational methods for sharing water conservation efforts with all residents. We have created interactive tools such as the questions tab, ideas, quick poll, and guestbook, to gain feedback from you!


What is the Water Efficiency Plan?

The City of Grand Junction in collaboration with the Ute Water Conservancy District and the Clifton Water District has developed a Regional Water Efficiency Plan (WEP). The purpose of the WEP is to help water utilities improve the overall water use efficiency by addressing issues of supply and demand and providing a defined method of solving problems and dealing with system inefficiencies. The WEP also provides both water utilities and the local communities with a means of using water resources wisely and prudently thus managing this precious exhaustible resource to its maximal responsible use. Community members are encouraged to review the plan and leave their questions regarding input on specific parts of the plan. In addition, an Ideas tab is located below to share ideas about the plan.

The WEP includes the following elements: profiles of existing water supply systems, historical water demands and demand forecasts, water efficiency goals, selection of water efficiency activities, and implementation and monitoring plans. Specific water conservation measures included in the WEP include reducing water system losses, replacing water fountains in schools with water bottle filling stations, toilet retrofits, audits of high-water users, implementing greywater systems, and turf replacement.

How can the community help?

This WEP is an update to the initial Water Conservation Plan adopted in 2012 and is intended to be broad and flexible so that it can be adapted to changing water conservation efforts over time. The goal of the regional WEP is to provide unified water education and community outreach programs that will aid the public in developing meaningful water conservation practices. City staff and our community partners want to hear your input on the WEP and other educational methods for sharing water conservation efforts with all residents. We have created interactive tools such as the questions tab, ideas, quick poll, and guestbook, to gain feedback from you!


The comment period for the Regional Water Efficiency Plan has closed. Thank you for your interest an be sure to check out our other projects. 

Let us know if you have other questions within the WEP. 

  • Share How about educating your city park workers on when to water the vast lawns in the city parks? I have seen many times they water during the hottest time of the day in the summer. They should also be educated on aiming the sprinklers so they don't water the parking lots or roadways in and around the parks. Lots of words in your Water Efficiency Plan about educating the public, businesses, etc. How about the city educates itself as well? on Facebook Share How about educating your city park workers on when to water the vast lawns in the city parks? I have seen many times they water during the hottest time of the day in the summer. They should also be educated on aiming the sprinklers so they don't water the parking lots or roadways in and around the parks. Lots of words in your Water Efficiency Plan about educating the public, businesses, etc. How about the city educates itself as well? on Twitter Share How about educating your city park workers on when to water the vast lawns in the city parks? I have seen many times they water during the hottest time of the day in the summer. They should also be educated on aiming the sprinklers so they don't water the parking lots or roadways in and around the parks. Lots of words in your Water Efficiency Plan about educating the public, businesses, etc. How about the city educates itself as well? on Linkedin Email How about educating your city park workers on when to water the vast lawns in the city parks? I have seen many times they water during the hottest time of the day in the summer. They should also be educated on aiming the sprinklers so they don't water the parking lots or roadways in and around the parks. Lots of words in your Water Efficiency Plan about educating the public, businesses, etc. How about the city educates itself as well? link

    How about educating your city park workers on when to water the vast lawns in the city parks? I have seen many times they water during the hottest time of the day in the summer. They should also be educated on aiming the sprinklers so they don't water the parking lots or roadways in and around the parks. Lots of words in your Water Efficiency Plan about educating the public, businesses, etc. How about the city educates itself as well?

    Sand asked 12 months ago

    Thank you for reaching out about our WEP Draft Plan and letting us know your thoughts on city water conservation.  As a general rule, the park operations team only waters during park closures (usually 10:00pm-6:00am). The only exceptions to these rules are when we are running sprinkler systems to trouble shoot issues, when our water supply is reliant on other organization such as HOAs or property management companies or if we are reseeding/ re sodding a space. In these instances, watering will be seen during daytime hours.  Additionally, If there has been a break in the sprinkler system that requires the water to be off for an extended period of time, we may place it on a catchup schedule for a week or so to replenish the ground moisture and then resume our normally watering practices. Parks and recreation is committed to water conservation and uses techniques such as cycle soak to ensure we deliver water as efficiently and effectively as possible. Parks has even gone further to design and build landscapes that are water wise using more resilient, native species.  This is an effort to reduce water use across the City’s planted spaces. Examples of this are found at the 5th street interchange, the new installments on north avenue and the 1st and Grand Ave interchange.  For a specific space where there is a question or  concern, please click on the following link: Report a Concern.

  • Share How about a financial incentive to reduce water consumption by way of a credit towards future water bill(s)? For instance, a monthly water savings of 10% (year over year) should be worth a 10% credit towards future water bill…or some formula that works. The idea here is we all like incentives to save a few dollars along the way. Grocery gas credits is a good example 😳🙂 on Facebook Share How about a financial incentive to reduce water consumption by way of a credit towards future water bill(s)? For instance, a monthly water savings of 10% (year over year) should be worth a 10% credit towards future water bill…or some formula that works. The idea here is we all like incentives to save a few dollars along the way. Grocery gas credits is a good example 😳🙂 on Twitter Share How about a financial incentive to reduce water consumption by way of a credit towards future water bill(s)? For instance, a monthly water savings of 10% (year over year) should be worth a 10% credit towards future water bill…or some formula that works. The idea here is we all like incentives to save a few dollars along the way. Grocery gas credits is a good example 😳🙂 on Linkedin Email How about a financial incentive to reduce water consumption by way of a credit towards future water bill(s)? For instance, a monthly water savings of 10% (year over year) should be worth a 10% credit towards future water bill…or some formula that works. The idea here is we all like incentives to save a few dollars along the way. Grocery gas credits is a good example 😳🙂 link

    How about a financial incentive to reduce water consumption by way of a credit towards future water bill(s)? For instance, a monthly water savings of 10% (year over year) should be worth a 10% credit towards future water bill…or some formula that works. The idea here is we all like incentives to save a few dollars along the way. Grocery gas credits is a good example 😳🙂

    dwculli1 asked about 1 year ago

    Hi, thank you for your question.  We appreciate the input.  Each of the water utilities, the City of Grand Junction, Ute Water Conservancy District, and Clifton Water District, have implemented tiered rate structures that are intended to incentivize water conservation.  If you use less than the 3,000 gallons per month, you only pay the base rate.  If you use more than 3,000 gallons per month, you pay for the additional usage on a fee per 1,000 gallons.  The rates per 1,000 gallons are progressively more if you surpass certain thresholds.